SafeGuard EMR Blog

Some of SafeGuarde’s EMR key features are E-Prescribing, IPAD Compatible, SMS Texting to patients, and E-Charting. 

(via mikehudack, maxistentialist)
I hope that Twitter doesn’t take it down, “Freedom of Speech” is a right.
The ecological detrimental damage that this is causing is mind boggling.  Future generations will be impacted if we don’t stop it and come together as one to do whatever we can to mitigate this disaster.  We can’t sit around and wait for the government to take action.

(via mikehudack, maxistentialist)

I hope that Twitter doesn’t take it down, “Freedom of Speech” is a right.

The ecological detrimental damage that this is causing is mind boggling.  Future generations will be impacted if we don’t stop it and come together as one to do whatever we can to mitigate this disaster.  We can’t sit around and wait for the government to take action.

Don’t forgot to take time to be thankful for what you have in life.

Don’t forgot to take time to be thankful for what you have in life.

Are the world’s greatest minds really working on the best projects?  I hope so.

hiten:

rahmin:

jonathanmoore:

Creativity is just connecting things.
The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we have.
Via Kitsune Noir

Are the world’s greatest minds really working on the best projects?  I hope so.

hiten:

rahmin:

jonathanmoore:

Creativity is just connecting things.

The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we have.

Via Kitsune Noir

hiten:

Hello iPad, goodbye netbook - Apple 2.0 - Fortune Tech

SafeGuard EMR is one of the first vendors to offer it’s electronic medical record clients IPAD compatibility.  It is easy to convert from other  EMR’s such as Practice Fusion, EClinicalWorks, and GE EMR to our EMR.   We will work with you every step of the way to customize our software to your needs.  We don’t force you to enter tickets because we value your time and know that you have patients to see.
Isn’t it time that you  go paperless, streamline your practice, and offer your patients complete flexibility?   Contact SafeGuard EMR today for an online demo.

hiten:

Hello iPad, goodbye netbook - Apple 2.0 - Fortune Tech

SafeGuard EMR is one of the first vendors to offer it’s electronic medical record clients IPAD compatibility.  It is easy to convert from other  EMR’s such as Practice Fusion, EClinicalWorks, and GE EMR to our EMR.   We will work with you every step of the way to customize our software to your needs.  We don’t force you to enter tickets because we value your time and know that you have patients to see.

Isn’t it time that you  go paperless, streamline your practice, and offer your patients complete flexibility?   Contact SafeGuard EMR today for an online demo.

Could Small Practices Be Left Behind in the Push for EHR Adoption?

SafeGuard EMR offers low cost solutions that fit you and your practice.  We are the Number One Choice of Doctors choosing an EMR.

Thursday, June 03, 2010

The federal government is banking that the billions of dollars allocated for health IT in the 2009 federal economic stimulus package will lead to widespread electronic health record adoption. But some stakeholders think it might be more of a gamble than a sure thing, noting that for many small physician practices, the Medicare and Medicaid incentive payments — and later penalties — might not be enough to overcome the barriers to EHR adoption.

Dozens of medical societies have urged CMS to make changes to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking describing how health care providers can demonstrate “meaningful use” of certified EHRs to qualify for incentive payments under the federal stimulus package. The groups want federal officials to make the requirements more attainable for smaller physician practices.

The final rule could be released any day now, but how many of the medical groups’ suggestions are incorporated remains to be seen.

Small Physician Practices a Key Group

Because most primary care is delivered through small physician practices, such offices are a key group in the government’s quest for widespread EHR adoption.

President Obama has set a goal of providing all U.S. residents with an EHR by 2014. According to 2009 preliminary results from CDC’s National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, about 20.5% of U.S. physicians reported having basicEHR systems, and 6.3% reported having a fully functional system.

In a March 15 comment letter to CMS, more than 95 state and specialty medical societies wrote, “The vast majority of physicians’ practices are comprised of five or fewer physicians. Encouraging physician of health IT, especially small physician practices, is critical to ensuring widespread EHR use.”

Furthermore, Vince Kuraitis — founder and principal of Better Health Technologies — and David Kibbe — a senior adviser to the American Academy of Family Physicians — note in a blog post that small physician practices with EHRs are influential in encouraging specialists to whom they refer patients to adopt the technology.

Small Practices Face Unique Challenges

All health care providers will face hurdles when it comes to shifting to computerized health records, but experts say those challenges likely will be more severe for small practice physicians.

Steven Waldren, director of AAFP’s Center for Health Information Technology, said that up until now, health IT systems have been focused primarily on documentation and billing, rather than managing populations and driving quality care. Because of this shift, it will be a challenge for physician practices of all sizes “to find product[s] to meet the intent of meaningful use,” Waldren said.

He noted that because small physician practices lack capital, it will be even more difficult for those who already have invested in some form of health IT to make another investment, pay for an upgrade or replace their system altogether.

Waldren also noted that small physician practices “don’t have the economy of scale like the large practices do where they could pull that $44,000 a doc and create some central services.” He added that a lot of small practices are located in “rural areas where they don’t have access to IT professionals to help them” in their EHR adoption.

The coalition of medical groups and state medical societies states in its comment letter, “Studies of EHR adoption clearly show that it takes more time for smaller practices to adopt and implement EHRs because they have fewer resources and support.” It adds, “Aggressive timelines and criteria during the initial stage of the incentive program will only serve to undermine this effort.”

Suggested Changes to NPRM

Steven Stack — an emergency physician and American Medical Association board member — said, “AMA is supportive of the widespread adoption and meaningful use of EHRs by physicians, but the Stage 1 criteria proposed by CMS are too aggressive,” adding, “It could unreasonably punish physicians who undertake great efforts to achieve meaningful use of EHRs — only to be denied incentive payments due to overly complex and unattainable criteria.”

Many medical groups have urged the federal government add greater flexibility to the meaningful use criteria to make participation in the incentive program more appealing for smaller physician practices.

Some of the medical groups’ suggestions include:

  • Offering partial incentives for partial meaningful use, rather than the current “all or nothing” approach;
  • Eliminating meaningful use objectives and measures that do not directly relate to EHR adoption; and
  • Reducing the number of clinical quality reporting measures.

Waldren noted that federal officials have stressed that “they really want to get it right.” Waldren said that based on discussions he had at a recent Physicians’ Electronic Health Record Collation meeting during which National Coordinator for Health IT David Blumenthal spoke, he believes some of the medical groups’ concerns will be addressed in the final rule, while others will not be. Waldren said he still is unsure which recommendations from the medical societies will be incorporated into the final rule.

Will Small Physician Practices Make the Leap?

Waldren said that AAFP has “some very serious reservations as the proposed rule is today that practices will even attempt to make the commitment” to adopting EHRs. He noted that to qualify for the Medicare and Medicaid incentive payments, physicians will have to make the upfront investment, implement the EHR system, begin using the system, do the required reporting, “and then if you miss one thing and you miss it just barely, you get $0.” He added, “So I think that’s a large potential risk.”

He added that given the track record of the federal government’s Physician Quality Reporting Initiative, some physicians are skeptical that they will be able to successfully receive the health IT incentive payments.

Experts have also noted that doctors risk little by not participating in the health IT incentive program in the first couple of years. Furthermore, some doctors and policy insiders have questioned whether the federal government will actually go through with the scheduled reimbursement penalties beginning in 2015.

Waldren said that he’s heard discussions in policy circles that medical societies could block the penalties from kicking in. He said that he believes the penalties will be somewhat dependent on how successful HITECH is at increasing the rate of adoption. He said, “We’re underneath the assumption that the penalties are on the books, they are law, and we need to make physicians aware and prepared for such.” However, he added that if EHR adoption “doesn’t get a lot of uptake, I think it may be challenging to keep those penalties where they’re at.”

Waldren said he has been telling physician practices that their reason for making an investment in EHRs should be to increase the efficiency of their practices, increase care quality, improve patient safety, and provide new features and services for patients, not to qualify for the $44,000 in incentive payments. However, he noted that those who are committed to EHR adoption might want to try to speed up their timetables to qualify for the meaningful use incentives.

Waldren said that physicians who adopt EHR software solely to meet the Stage 1 meaningful use criteria likely will “spend a lot more money over the long run than the $44,000 they would get from the federal government.”

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We disagree with Waldren that you will spend more then $44,000 implementing an EMR.  SafeGuard EMR is  easy to use, easy to implement, and affordable.

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
Albert Einstein
dpstyles:

courtneyc:

As a fellow confused elementary school shoplifter (true story), I find this adorable. (via Racked)


I like the fact that this child sent a letter to the store apologizing for their mistake.  This builds integrity, character, and strong morals.   I like to give Christmas presents to kids and see if their parents have them write thank-you notes as mine required of me my whole life until it became habit.  There is nothing better than a hand-written note in your snail mailbox. Almost a lost art.   It is one of my goals to send real letters to friends every month.

dpstyles:

courtneyc:

As a fellow confused elementary school shoplifter (true story), I find this adorable. (via Racked)

I like the fact that this child sent a letter to the store apologizing for their mistake.  This builds integrity, character, and strong morals.   I like to give Christmas presents to kids and see if their parents have them write thank-you notes as mine required of me my whole life until it became habit.  There is nothing better than a hand-written note in your snail mailbox. Almost a lost art.   It is one of my goals to send real letters to friends every month.

How wrong is this?  Can you spot what is wrong with this picture?  One of my friends woke up to find her Boxer and new kitty trading places.

How wrong is this?  Can you spot what is wrong with this picture?  One of my friends woke up to find her Boxer and new kitty trading places.

I totally agree that I am more apt to take the advice of my Doctor who actually is fit as well and gives tips for personal experience.  If you hired a personal trainer do you want someone who is fit and in shape?  Or would you be just as happy with someone who isn’t in great shape and believe that they can help you achieve your goals?